Articles

The Legacy of "Deep Throat"

In blogs, Journalism, media, obituaries, U.S History on December 19, 2008 by Editor Z


No not that “Deep Throat”

W Mark Felt the man who was later revealed to be “Deep Throat”, probably the most famous anonymous source in American History when he revealed to Reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein that tied burglars at the Democratic National Committee Headquarters to the Nixon White House and led to the downfall of America’s 37th President, died Friday at the age of 95.

Despite Nixon being reviled by history and many Americans there is a minute band of Nixon defenders (many like former Nixon speech writer and adviser Pat Buchanan and former Watergate burglar turned Miami Vice Guest star and Radio talk show host G Gordon Liddy) are former employees of Nixon.

The conservative site Hotair.com has an interesting piece on Felt.

In my estimation, Felt was neither hero nor traitor. He didn’t disclose the information to Woodward and Bernstein from a noble calling to Truth and Justice. After Hoover died in May 1972, everyone in his inner circle assumed that each of them would succeed him as Director. Nixon had no intention of perpetuating Hoover’s corrupt influence, however, and appointed L. Patrick Gray to the position while having Felt handle the actual operation of the Bureau. Felt considered that a betrayal, and struck back by undermining Nixon.

But that doesn’t make Nixon innocent, either. Felt knew that Nixon had skeletons in his closet and made sure they got exposed. In truth, most whistle blowers don’t act entirely out of a sense of self-sacrifice, and Felt was no exception. And as in the case of many whistle blowers, the information was accurate and the offenses were serious. Nixon needed to go, and Felt played a major role in sending him packing.

True. I think the best way to sum up Felt and his motivations is that he committed a courageous act for the wrong and self serving reasons.

Digg!

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